The Homicidal Family Dream

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So the night after a long shift at work when my legs are dead, I decide to have a chase dream… Brilliant.

We were running through a train station, trying to catch up with a friend. He was too far ahead though, and we didn’t see where he went.

I chose a random platform he may have gotten onto. I boarded the train, staring at everyone to make sure it wasn’t him. He wasn’t there.

My other friend caught up to me, and sat down on the train like we were going somewhere. Everyone else was staring at me. So I got off at the last second. The doors slammed shut, and my friend watched in horror as she departed from the platform.

I walked back to a house. It was about four storeys high and pretty damn nice. However, inside was a bit of a muddled maze. Or trap, if you will. And I was the mouse.

Within the dining room, two twin toddlers were playing with their dolls. They wore pretty pink dresses up to their knees and blonde hair in tight pigtails. They saw me enter, dropped their dolls and grinned with pointed teeth. Their eyes glowed.

I ran from the room and they chased me all over the house. No matter what room I was in, I could hear them giggling. Each time I thought I was safe, one of them appeared and swiped for me with tiny fingers.

Eventually, I found a doorway to the outside. I walked through it to find myself in an allotment, and a massive one at that. But before I could even step foot onto the soil, I heard yelling. Angry yelling.

The father of the two girls was running towards me, spade in hand. I jumped up onto one of the hedges so I could see everywhere better.

As far as the eye could see were field upon field of plants and vegetables and greenhouses. I couldn’t even tell which direction to run in.

In the neighbouring allotments I could see stereotypical farmers in straw hats, mowing lawns or digging up weeds. I had a feeling they’d be just as friendly as this man…

He ran towards me, trying to hit me.

“You disturbed my daughters, bitch.”

His wife, a rotund woman in an apron and waving a rolling pin in the air, came out of the kitchen and joined in with his yelling.

I ran across the hedgetops, along bamboo trellises, even across greenhouse roofs, but I just couldn’t shake him off.

“Go on, git her!” his wife screamed, like the meal she was preparing depended on her husband catching me.

There was nowhere safe to run. I was trapped. If I ran I’d be lost and if I stayed still he would catch me. Suddenly I wished I’d stayed on the train.

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